Recap: ‘Lost’ Finale Raises Questions

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Lost_jack
The two-hour season finale was another Jack (pictured, right) episode. But rather than a flashback, we were given a genuine flash forward. Wild. Confusing, too. (Motorola Krzr phone, anyone?  If it was a flashback prior to 2004, he couldn’t have had one.) But we went along for the ride anyway, and collectively gasped when they confirmed the flash forward.  (You know you did.)

Are they all off the island? Are the writers done with the on-island story except for what are now flashbacks to the island?  We have eight to nine months to wait and see. For now, let’s go back to the beginning …

Early on, I definitely thought we were watching some
alternate-reality Scruffy Jack. But then it appeared to be an earlier
time in Jack’s life — after he left Thailand? Clues were there for the
grabbing that this was the future.  Besides the above-mentioned phone,
Dr. Rob Hamill called him “Dr. Jack Shephard – the hero twice over.”
Once for the woman and child in the car, the other for the big rescue
from the island, I guess.  However, they do their best to confuse us
with Jack’s tirade when he asks Hamill to bring down his father and see
who’s drunker, and then later producing a prescription signed for by
his dad.  Though it seems weird that the guy who recognized him in the
pharmacy would only mention the rescue of the car crash victims.  You’d
think that he might mention the fact that he was also rescued from a
plane crash.

So was Jack a drunk and a pill popper and the reason he wants to go
back so badly because he wasn’t with Kate, or because he didn’t save
everyone on the island?

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The newspaper clipping (see right), nearly impossible to read, but of course
enhanced by HD viewers on and posted at losteastereggs.blogspot.com,
indicates that there was a “Man found dead in downtown [Los Angeles] loft.”  The rest of the article is tough, but here are some other notes:  “The body of J … ntham of New York was … shortly after 4 a.m. in the … of Grand Avenue.” Then, “Ted S … a doorman at The Tower … heard loud noises … ing loft. Concerned for .. he … the … discovered the … hanging from a beam in the

Most speculation is that the name is Jeremy Bentham (1748-1832), who
- like Locke’s and Rousseau’s namesakes – were historical
philosophers.  (In fact, one of Bentham’s main influences was the
philosopher John Locke.  Coincidence?)  Since we don’t know a Jeremy
Bentham that both Jack and Kate would know at this point, maybe Bentham
and Ben have something to do with one another?  Or could Bentham be
someone they meet between the phone call Jack makes on island and
present day?  Either way, Kate seems disgusted at the idea that she
would have considered going to his funeral.  And Jack says he’s neither
friend, nor family … though he did cry at reading the clip.  So we
have strong feelings from both of them on whoever he is.

FYI, the funeral home, “Hoffs/Drawlar”, is an anagram for “Flash Forward.”

RIP Charlie Pace.  However, with the seemingly random and
unexplained introduction of his ancestor Dexter Stratton (the DS ring)
in the last episode, I can’t imagine that’s the last we’ll be seeing of
Charlie.  Maybe he’ll get a little of the island’s resuscitation.
Though you do have to wonder: Why didn’t he just swim out of the
porthole and up to the surface once the water had flooded the chamber?

Lost2_2
Here’s another mysterious zinger. The moon pool in the Looking Glass
doesn’t flood the station because of inside air pressure. So once the
water in the chamber rose to the height of the porthole, wouldn’t the
air pressure have kept it from flooding above that line – giving
Charlie enough air and room to float until he could swim out or be
rescued?

While it was a great coincidence that the combination of the Looking
Glass’s jamming signal was programmed by “a musician” – and how great
of Bonnie to tell Charlie that with what seemed like a dying wink – did
it seem odd to anyone else that he would know which numbers on the
keypad corresponded to each note in the Beach Boys’ “Good Vibrations?”

Greta and Bonnie, the women thought to be “on assignment in Canada”,
are no longer.  We hardly knew them.  Yet Mikhail is like the Energizer
Bunny who keeps going and going. This time, though, a shot to the chest
with a spear gun seemed like it should have done him in.  Plus, he had
time to mock Charlie from the window as he was exploding the grenade.
Is he dead from the explosion?  He’s got another six lives to go. Will
Desmond be able to warn the Lostaways in time that it’s “Not Penny’s
Boat?”

Sawyer and Juliet made a strange couple.  But we got our guffaws
when we saw Hurley come to the rescue in the Hurleymobile.  Hurley is
the man!  And that provided the episode with some much-needed comic
relief.

Can we assume that Tom will be back in the season ahead?  I’m guessing yes.  Let’s hope he doesn’t hold a grudge.

Locke returns.  And with a visit from (a much taller) Walt, for the
first time this season!  Was it Walt, or Jacob or Smokey manifesting as
Walt so that John would stop them?  Either way, John’s inability to
kill seems to be very selective.  Naomi, who it seems now we had even
less reason to trust, is gone.  Who was she and who is Bukowski, the
guy who answered the satellite phone call? 

Speaking of the call, weren’t Naomi’s instructions to Jack a lot
less complicated than the call she actually made?  She seemed to say
turn it on, wait for a signal, press the green button.  She appeared to
press multiple keys.

Although I don’t believe Ben for a second, his panic seemed
completely legit.  Is it because they are all seriously in danger, or
just that his way of life on the island is in danger?

They strung us along for a minute with the idea that Sayid, Bernard
and Jin were dead.  Luckily, Tom convinced Ryan to play along.  Tom,
Richard and Alex seem to be fairly vocal Ben-detractors now.  And there
seem to be no vocal Ben-supporters.

Rousseau is overwhelmed to be reunited with Alex for the first time
in 16 years.  So much so that her first words to her long-lost daughter
are “will you help me tie him up?”

In the novel “Through the Looking Glass” by Lewis Carroll, Alice
goes through the mirror and arrives in a backwards world – not unlike
the backwards world we see in the flash forward where Jack’s a mess and
Kate is the upstanding citizen.

February 2008, people.


This recap is written by Sean Salo, our Resident "Lost" Nerd.

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