Talking Celebrity Rehab Episode 3 With Dr. Drew, Jenn Gimenez, And Dr. Sharp

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Celebrity Rehab With Dr. Drew is back for a fifth season, and we’re lucky enough to have the opportunity to talk about the show with Dr. Drew and some of the other staff at the Pasadena Recovery Center to get an inside look at the rehabilitation process. This week, we spoke with Dr. Drew and Jenn Gimenez and Dr. John Sharp about the addition of Jessica “Sugar” Kiper to the show and the surprisingly touching results of equine therapy.

First up, Dr. Drew…
Last week we talked about Bai Ling and what caused her to get up on the roof. Do you ever assume anybody is exaggerating their symptoms or their behavior because there are cameras there?


You can tell when people are posturing for the camera but I don’t think anybody’s ever exaggerated for the camera. This is just something that people do in treatment, there’s nothing at all unusual about it, this is all just standard stuff. If somebody were to do something completely out of character for us to see in treatment, well…it’s never happened. But by the way, when Bai Ling finally took her medication she got a LOT better.

One of the more touching scenes to me was the equine therapy scene, especially the part with Sean Young, she seemed truly moved my her experience there with the horses.

Sean did a lot of work. She really, really applied herself to treatment.

At one point Sean says she feels like a loser in treatment, ashamed of her addiction—


She fluctuates between that and immense grandiosity, but she is an extremely bright, capable woman, she’s a substantial person she is neither worthy of shame nor worthy of immense grandiosity, she’s much more than that, so she’s developing a much more stable and realistic self-image of someone who’s got more than she knew she had. And the degree to which she’s allowed her relationship with her husband to undermine everything. She’s someone who’s got more than she knew she had, she’s really substantial.

When we spoke to Jenn Gimenez, our first thought was about Bai Ling’s resistance to taking prescribed drugs. Bai was upset at having to take one drug while trying to get off another, so asked Jenn if that’s a common reaction.

Jenn Gimenez: People do get scared that they are gonna get hooked on meds. Like all of a sudden they think that they need to rely on something else to keep them going. A lot of times people get really upset about the fact they are diagnosed some other things, other than drugs and alcohol. She is the type of patient that came into this facility needing medication in order to get her to start the process of recovery. What she was taking was not a addictive medication, it was only to make her center herself so she could start the process of recovery and she could start dealing with her serious issues.

During this episode, Amy states that she feels like this facility is a prison, which obviously is a little bit of a stretch and everybody sort of takes offense to that, what do you think of her saying that?


I think Amy’s statement was very fictional in the fact that I know how they were treated and they were treated very well. You’re getting care from like, the A-list doctors of all time. And people are, we are literally at their beck and call. This is a process where you start to find yourself and find your issues, and she is still in such denial that she doesn’t want to address anything about herself and she’s like continued to bash the outside stuff. Now its jail, now it’s the food, and the way the people are treated there is bad. Before that it was the cameras. I mean, it’s always something.

I have to admit I was skeptical about the equine therapy, like what is this horse business? And then you see it and they completely bond with the animal they really let their emotions come through.


They did!There is something pure about that. The thing about this animal is it’s so nurturing, it’s so healing, it’s so pure. I know that it’s very therapeutic and it really does work, believe it or not.

And it works well for Jessica Kiper, who enters the facility in this episode. She comes in with a marijuana addiction, which I think is hard for some people to wrap their head around because people brush it off or don’t think it’s addictive.

Yeah, marijuana is a drug just like pills are, just like shooting up is, you can abuse it and it is a drug, period. People tend to forget that. Just like saying “Oh, I just drink on the weekends,” but that person can still be a alcoholic. It’s about the spiritual matter and how you feel. There’s not a day that she hasn’t drank or smoked marijuana. Unfortunately society accepts that more, like it’s no big deal, but it’s addicting. I just think that it’s amazing that someone like Jessica comes on the show and you can see, she is an all-American girl that smokes a little to much weed actually really does have a problem, ’cause it’s more than just that.

There’s also a lot of tension this week with Steven and Amy, when Steven calls out Amy’s denial as interfering with his own treatment.

Steven…it’s not his first rodeo and he knows the process and at this point you’ve seen the willingness of Steven, and…hearing someone constantly whine whine whine… When you’re in the group itself it does effect it, but personally, Steven is not focusing on himself and what he can do. What he is hopefully saying to himself is “This isn’t about anyone else, and yes this girl does irk me, but I’m here to get better for me.”

Does the rest of the group commiserate or discuss what’s going on? Is that a high school question to ask, whether they are talking about each other and gossiping?

Yes, yes! Absolutely…again I keep saying they’re like kids. You’re talking about people acting like they are in junior high, high school, and you know they are forming groups and all going “Oh my God can you believe…” At the end of the day we are like really…is that what you’re focusing on?

We also spoke with Dr. Sharp, one of the resident psychiatrists on staff to get some insight about Amy Fisher and Bai Ling’s behavior this week as well.

Last time, we spoke about Bai Ling on the roof. Is there a worry now that she’s out of treatment that when she watches the show back she’ll be embarrassed and that would be potentially dangerous to her, after making progress in treatment?

That’s a good question, and one we addressed in after-care with her, we started to talk about what it would be like when the show airs, what are your concerns? And Bai Ling said “I’m so worried that people will get the wrong idea about me,” and I tried to use a medical model and say, you know, you were kind of disturbed in a way that wasn’t your fault, you were feeling something you couldn’t understand and now you do and you were able to get treatment for that and you’re so much better. It’s not what you started with, it’s where you end up, and I think people will see how good it is that you were able to take care of yourself. It’s not that initial spectacle that she needs to worry about, but rather the outcome of her treatment.

Amy Fisher is so self-aware, and yet she won’t give in and admit her problems this week. Is she any less self-conscious new or willing to admit her problems?

She actually came out of treatment more self-conscious, more aware of the impact of her way of dress, of her actions, on how she’s being perceived. She is very proud today to have made the decision to give up adult films, which she felt she needed alcohol to self-medicate around. At first she knew that might be a problem but she tried to discount it, and she was minimizing her concerns, but as she got more sensitized, she found the power to say “This is not good for me, I don’t have to do this.”

  1. Susanne Hebert, MSW says:

    It is absoultely incredulous to watch you allow someone with an obvious Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD. e.g., Amy) take over the entire focus of the show and the program. Whoever made that decision has to be just as sick as she is or sicker. You are not a Dual Diagnosis Tx Ctr, yet you are willing to put yourself in the position as if you are and in the meantime putting all others in the program at risk (walking out, frustration, relapse, etc)!! The toxicity of the BPD throughout is absolutely palpable and you are enabling the individual’s behavior to become the entire focus (for the sake of sponsor-driven $$$ TV??!!), promoting the continuance and severity of the behavior and the individual’s best laid plans to prosper and grow. It you were treating clients on an individual basis (hence, a whole different program and show), some of yoiur decisions might possess some sense/level of mindfulness, forethought, and/or professionalism. Instead the entire show/program has run amuck and your clients are no longer in a safe, healthy, client-centered, and professionally managed environment. The program is so unhealthy that it has become too sickening for many of us to continue watching it, supoort it and/or promote it to other folks who are sick and suffering and dancing on the edge of a severe life and death disease. I no longer will support, endorse, or encourage the viewing of your show to anyone. I have never used it as a reliable treatment modality; however, in the past you have sometimes been able to bring to light some examples of the insanity and dangers of the disease for some who are just starting to attempt to become honest with self and others.

    The program has never become a reiable source for treatment; however, with proper support, some individuals have been able to occasionally use to show to visualize some of the madness qualities that the disease can take on. As of now, the show only serves to provide some fresh examples of what not to do if one hopes to achieve contented and healthy sobriety.

    In essence, YOU HAVE SOLD OUT!!!! The very least you can do at this point is be honest and set forth a plan to reverse the program’s ominous direction. Maybe, just maybe, you might even save a life along the way…

    Susanne Hebert, MSW

  2. Indiana says:

    Stopped watching show after Jenn joined this show ! I thought she acted very improperly in sober house with male and female patients, get rid of her, she is just a drama QUEEN !

  3. Patricia Bacon says:

    I love this show and look forward to it every week. Radaronline is reporting Dr. Drew put the show on indefinate hiatus due to his other shows and being too busy. While I enjoy watching
    Dr. Drew on other shows, this is what he is known for. Please don’t quit this show!!!

  4. Billinda says:

    Sugar Just Keep Coming ! ! !

  5. Linda B says:

    Amy Fisher is from my home town.. She lived in the most “privileged” part ie $$$$. Shes a spoiled brat. And a sicko, how CAN U DO PORN U GOT KIDS!!! No wonder she wast to blot it out by drink. And has the same idea that all people get blackouts as a norm of drinking….sheesh,,,,

  6. nancy says:

    Jenn was doing her best ,she is trying to help the others who she can relate to . Amy is the drama Queen so far she found fault with everything . Whats up with her face ? She used to be pretty ! Sean Young is a VERY talented actor , I hope to see her in more shows ( she is still beautiful ) ! I think Steven belongs in a mental hospital , HE LOVES TO CAUSE TROUBLE !

  7. sheila says:

    Amy Fisher HA-HA-HA really??? she said the reporters,news media ect…… ruined a 16 teen year old life, NOT REALLY i think she ruined her life on her own by shooting someone in the face,till she mans up and apologizes {and mean it.} she will never get better. I thought it was funny what Steve said i laughed all day at that one. i enjoy the show but amy has bigger issues than i think dr.drew can help with.poor poor amy poor poor me she says everyone has ruined my life but me.get a grip amy you ruined your life no one else as soon as you realize that you might have a chance at recovery.

  8. iowa says:

    Have been a psych nurse for many years and am confused as to why Amy is there when all she seems to be doing is manipulating the group and attention seeking behaviors. I am afraid I agree with Ms. Hebert in regards to Amy. The show needs to somehow get back on track and stop continuing to provide constant attention to this BPD woman. Her actions and toxicity are extremely palpable in group and there are other members who are at risk here.

  9. mary says:

    why does amy have to do porn? why doesnt her husband support her? looks like he married her because of her earning potential. she is just sad , pitiful and being used by this husband. she has ruined her face and continues to pick men who are worthless., and doesnt own her choices ruined her life .

  10. Jan says:

    Jenn, in my opinion, is a drama queen & totally turns any/every situation into “all about me”. She was horrible on Sober House & treated those in recovery unfairly. She should not be on Celebrity
    Rehab! She’s toxic!
    Amy Fisher should be made to leave. Steve Adler is right, if you can’t admit you have a problem, then you don’t belong in rehab & are not being a productive/contributing member of the group. That Steve Adler was reprimanded and Amy Fisher defended & coddled is sickening!